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ENTOMOLOGIST

An Illustrated Journal

OF

GENERAL ENTOMOLOGY.

EDITED BY RICHARD SOUTH, F.E:S.

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF

ROBERT ADKIN, F.E.S. MARTIN JACOBY, F.E.S.

T. R. BILLUPS, F.E.S. W. F. KIRBY, F.L.S., F.E.S.

W. LUCAS DISTANT, F.E.S., &c. J. H. LEECH, B.A., F.L.S., F.E.S. EDWARD A. FITCH, F.L.S., F.E.S. Dr. D. SHARP, F.R.S., F.E.S., &c. F. W. FROHAWE, F.E.S. G. H. VERRALL, F.E.S.

W. WARREN, M.A., F.E.S:

‘‘By mutual confidence and mutual aid Great deeds are done and great discoveries made.”

VOLUME THE THIRTY-THIRD.

LONDON:

WEST, NEWMAN & CO., 54, HATTON GARDEN, SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT & CO., Limitep.

1900,

f

85240

PRINTERS &F% PUBLISHERS 9 {

LIST OF

Apxin, Rossert, F.E.S., 128, 313

Atprrson, E. G., 233, 273

Axuperson, Miss E. M., 248, 311

ANDERSON, JOSEPH, 177, 192, 250, Se 354

Anprews, T. B., 268

Annett, H. E., 275, 278

' ARKLE, J., 10, 13, 14, 49, 181, 183, 203, 273

Baker, GEORGE, 269

Bankes, Eustace R., M.A., F.E.S., 349

Barravup, P. J., 93, 131, 355

Barton, W. H., 250, 277, 354

Bastow, W. H., 273

Barrerssy, Frances J., 226

BrEADNELL, HERBERT, 249, 270, 279

BrEAvuLanD, J., 13

Betu, Rey. Jonn W. B., 249, 250, 277

Beuuamy, F. & C., 17, 157

Betnamy, FReEp. G., 228

Bircu, FREDERICK, 22, 99, 319

Brrp, J. F., 224

Bisuop, HE. B., 268

Bisuop, H. S., 278

BuaxkesoroueH, THos. B., 181

Buatuwayt, F. D., 278

BLENKARN, STANLEY A.,

Bostock, W., 303, 311

Briaes, C. A., F.E.S., 52

Brown, Henry H., 14, 351

Browne, G. B., 248

Burr, Maucoum, F.Z.S., F.E.S., 89

Bururr, A. G., Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.8., &e., 1, 124, 168, 189

Buruer, W. E., 275

Canvert, Puinip P., 350

CanspaLE, W. D.,‘272

Cant, A., F.E.S., 228

CarpInaLL, ALLAN W., 92, 307

Carr, F. M. B., 12, 49, 130, 204, 228, 274, 277

Carter, C. E. O., 248, 249

Carter, Wiuuiam A., 158, 203, 313

Carman, T. A., M.D., F.E.S., 69, 82, 224, 282

CuawneEr, Miss E. F., F.E.S., 248

Curisty, W. M., F.E.S., 88

CHITTENDEN, D., 273, 276, 304, 307

Cuark, Frep. Noap, 225

Craxton, Rev. W., 271, 306

Cockayne, E. A., 305

CockEeRELL, T. D. A., F.Z.S., F.E.S., 40, 61, 85, 173, 201, 217, 243, 302

ConruRvp, C. W..,, 10,.13,.60,'92, 276, 278, 307

Conquest, G. Hbon 353

Corprer, Henry, 304, 312

CorNELL, Ernest, 275

50, 91, 225

CONTRIBUTORS.

Cortam, ArtHuR, 276, 278, 303

Court, T. H., 92

Crewr, Huco Harper, 308

Dapp, Enwarp Martin, 161, 283, 340

Datz, C. W., F.E.S., 75, 180, 351

Daurtry, Rey. T. W., M.A., F.L.8., F.E.S., 305, 312

Dannatt, WALTER, F.E.S., 203, 251, 299

Day, Rey. ArcHIBALD, 268, 270, 273

Distant, W. L., F.E.S., 92, 209, 261

Dixon, Henry J., 307

Donovan, R. J. F., 143

Doveuas, ALFRED E., 250

Druirt, A., 202

East, Rev. Artuur, 88, 211, 257

Epwarps, Miss A. D., 14

Epwarps, W., 304, 313

Enwes, Henry J., F.R.S, F.LS., &e., 223

Evans, J. J. O., 352

Farrcuinp, W., 312

Fircu, E. A., F.L.S., F.E.S., 274

Finzi, J. A., F.E.S., 250

Fisuer, T. H., 225

FiercHer, T. B., R.N., F.E.S., 129, 228

Fowuer, J. H., 267, 269, 272, 275

Freeman, R., 247, 248

Frexe, Percy E., F.E.S., 352

Fremuin, H. S., F.E.S., 37

Frounawk, F. W., M.B.O.U., F.E.S., 101, 130, 300, 303, 304, 306

Frouawk, MarGaret, 130

Gauan, C. J., M.A., F.E.S., 18, 97, 132,

159, 205, 253, 314, 361

GarReTT, Henry E., 279, 351

Gites, Lewis S., 249

Gitues, W. 8., 191, 308

Grauam, S., 306

Grosvenor, T. H., 277

Grote, A. Rapcuirre, A.M., 120

Hageart, James C., 46, 92

Hamuin, C., 305

Hamm, A. H., 88, 274, 277

Hansen, Dr. H. J., 116, 169, 334

Harcourt-Batu, W., 199, 223

Harris, W. T., 269, 277, 352

Henperson, G., 353, 355

Howe, T. L., 49, 50

Hopson, G. V., F.E.S., 186

Hurcurnson, C. W., 267

Hype, P., 91

Imus, A. D., 250

Jackson, F. W. J., 305

JAGER, J., 326

James, Russet E., 279, 359

JerreRys, T. B., 15, 202

LY; LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS.

Kane, W. F. pr Vismes, M.A., M.R.1.A., &c., 29, 79, 125, 152, 192, 197, 328

Kemp, 8. K., 181

Kemp, 8. W., 269, 277

Kine, H. A., 269, 270, 278

Kirsy, W. F., F.L.S., F.E.S., 51, 280, 324

Krrraupy, G. W., F.E.S., &e., 10, 24, 25, 52, 70, 77, 87, 100, 134, 135, 136, 148, 169, 175, 177, 183, 184, 207, 232, 238, 254, 256, 262, 266, 293, 296, 301, 321, 322, 334, 349, 355, 361, 362, 363

Knaces, H. Guarp, M.D., F.L.S., 109

Lappman, R., 12, 13, 269

La Carp, H., 310

Lanz, E. W., 95

Lane, H. C., M.D., F.E.S., 104

Latuy, Percy L., 213

Lawrance, A. J., 271, 306

Leieu, G. F., 229, 302

Lirtnewoop, Franr, 355

Lowrtuer, R. C., 310

Lucas, W. J., B.A., F.H.S.; 2, 12, 41, 43, 49, 74, 89, 90, 129, 137, 158, 174, 181, 201 ,202, 210, 215, 225, 259, 266, 267, 271, 272, 274, 275, 279, 297, 301, 338, 350, 354, 355

MacKenziz, Vivian Sr. Crarr, 245

MacKinnon, F. M. A., 177

MarsHatu, Guy A. K., F.Z.S., 218

MASEFIELD, Joun, R. B., 18

Mann, A. J., 248, 275

May, AuBert, 129, 131, 275, 307

Metpota, Prof. R., F.R.8., F.C.S., F.E.S., 249, 306, 354, 355

MERRIFIELD, F., F.E.S., 232

Mitrorp, R. 8., 277, 310

MocsuEr-Frrryman, Lieut.-Col. A. F., 308

More, Rospert Scuaw, 351, 353

Morey, Cuaupez, F.E.S., 247

Moss, Rev. A. Mines, 21, 270, 280, 307, 354

Nasu, Rev. A., 269, 270, 271, 275, 352

Nasu, W. Girrorp, 304, 309, 310, 312

Nix, Jonn A., 354

Oxpaker, F. A., 311

OuprieLtp, Grorce W., M.A., F.L.S., F.Z.S., &e., 276

OxtpHam CHARLES, 309

PEACHELL, G. ERNEST, 276, 304

Puinures, Rev. W. J. Leicu, 43, 274

PrrrarD, Brrnarp, 249

Prey, J. B., 269, 271, 275

Porritt, Geo. T., F.L.S., F.E.S., 247, 250, 301

PripEeavx, R. M., 249

Prout, Louis B., F.E.S., 11, 53

Pucxripver, J. §., 311

Quaint, AmBrosE, F.E.§S., 5, 221, 225

Ransom, Epwarp, 13

Raynor, Rev. Ginpert H., 91, 225, 272, 275

Raynor, L. G. S., 274, 275, 280

_ Reece, E. T. B., 94

Rerp, Capt. S. G., F.H.S., 305

TioBERTSHAW, ARTHUR, 304

Rouuason, W. A., 310

Romer, T., 311

Rosa, A. F., 33

Roruscurip, Hon. N. Cuaruss, 352, 353

RoutitepGe, G. B., F.E.S8., 20

RowntreEE, J. H., 313

Rownanp-Brown, H., M.A., F.H.S., 132, 159, 205, 253, 314, 361

Russeuu, A., 129

RusseEwut, G. M., 310

Rypon, ArtHuR H., 43, 226

Sapine, H., 303, 304, 353

Saxpy, J. L., 129, 269, 276

Setu-Smuiry, L. M., 305

SHEPHEARD-Watwyn, H. W., 16, 269

Sicu, ALFRED, 130

Srmmonps, A., 353

SuapEN, Rey. C. A., 274, 275

SmaLupeice, A. Monineux, 268

Smiru, E. J. Srncietron, 268

Smitu, T. Percivan, 249

Smith, W. W., 11, 202

Sourn, Ricwarp, F.E.S., 10, 43, 68, 92, 99, 103, 104, 136, 155, 178, 180, 181, 184, 208, 266, 271, 272, 273, 276, 281, 303, 305, 313, 322, 323, 325, 348, 349

Sparks, EH. G. J., B.A., F.E.S., 39, 268, 210, 272, 278

Sranpen, R. S., F.L.S8., F.E.S., 350

Stanpruss, Prof. Dr. Max, 161, 283, 340

Stupp, E. F., M.A., F.E.S., 130

Tapp, W. H.,; 353

Tetuery, J. B., 274, 276

THomeson, Haronp P., 268, 270, 273, 277

Tuompson, HERBERT, 304

THoRNEWILI, Rey. Cuas. F., 278, 307

Trotuopr, Mrs. Anice, 157

Turner, D. P., 177, 273, 275, 278, 309

Turner, Hy. J., F.E.S., 20, 97, 133, 160, 206, 230, 317

Turner, Lewis L., 267, 270, 279, 351

Tort, J. W., F.B:S.; 42

UrqunHart, Miss, 267

Urwicx, W. F., 266

VAUGHAN, J. WixLiAms, 224

Wawpecrave, Rt. Hon. Earl, 305, 312

Waser, J. J., F.E.S., 18

Wauxrer, Rey. F. A., D.D., F.L.S:, &c., 236, 273, 275, 277

WAINWRIGHT, Co~BRAN J., F.E.S., 21, 98, 133, 160, 230, 319

Watkins & Doncaster, 304, 310

Warsure, J. C., 89, 278

Wetts, H. O., 202, 272, 274, 308

WHitTakEr, Oscar, 95, 278, 356

Wuirttz, F. G., 308

Witurams, T. Gopparp, 274, 305

Wooprorpeg, F. C., 12

Woo.nouse, J. W., 203, 269

WorsLey-Woop, H., 279

INDEX.

ao ee

GENERAL.

Aberrations of British Lepidoptera, 101

Aberration of Argynnisadippe (fig.), 281; of Vanessa urtice, 177

Abnormal emergence of Smerinthus po- puli, 12

Abundance of Plusia gamma, 307

Acherontia atropos in Bucks, 250; at Chichester, 250; in Gloucestershire, 269; in Hampshire, 269, 351; in Herefordshire, 269; in Kendal dis- trict, 353; in Kent, 269; in London, 304; in Norfolk, 269 ; in Northampton, 250; in Oxfordshire, 269; at Penarth, 49; in Suffolk, 270; in Surrey, 270; in Sussex, 270; in Westmoreland, 270; in Worcestershire, 270, 304; in 1899, 13; in October, 351; and Colias in 1900, 348

Acronycta alni in Herefordshire, 271

Aischna cyanea abundant in 1899, 91; at Paddington, 225; grandis on the wing at dusk, 88

Aleucis pictaria in Kent, 307

Anthills at the Paris Exhibition, 248

Anticlea sinuata in Dorset, 225

Apatura iris in Northamptonshire, 303

Aplecta occulta in Norfolk, 271

Argynnis adippe in Surrey, 249; aglaia var. at Dover, 303: var. charlotta, 350

Aromia moschata and Rhagium bifascia- tum near Chester, 181

Asphondylia mentzeliz, sp. n., 302

Assembling, 202

A winter-day’s sport with the net in Na- tal, 228

Bees from Juarez, Mexico, on a small collection of, 217

Bibliographical and nomenclatorial notes on the Rhynchota—No. 1, 238

Black varieties on a South Lancashire Moss, 248

British dragonflies of the older English authors, 41, 74, 174, 215, 259, 297, 338

British Odonata, new work on, 43

British Orthoptera, 89

Butterflies and Moths of Malvern,’ the 42

Butterflies collected in the South of France and in Corsica, 104; observed in Switzerland, 33

Butterfly hunter’s holiday, 233

Captures and Field Reports, 13, 44, 91, 130, 181, 202, 225, 248, 267, 302, 351

Captures at electric light in Chester dis- trict, 92; at light in 1899, 130

Captures of Odonata, 50

Caradrina ambigua in Hampshire, 272; at Pagham, 355

Catalogue of the Lepidoptera of Ireland, a,29, 79, 125, 152, 192; Supplement,328

Catocala fraxini in the Isle of Wight, 308; in Norfolk, 306 ; nupta in 1899, 13, 50; on tarred posts, 271

Cheerocampa elpenor on wild balsam, 270; nerii in Kent, 305; at Teign- mouth, 352

Cicadidz from China, description of a new species (fig.), 209

Cirrhcedia xerampelina in Notts, 355

Ccenonympha pamphilus var., 248

Colias edusa in June, in Devonshire, 228; at Eastbourne, 225; at Ringwood, 228; in Somersetshire, 228; in October, 352

Colias edusa in 1900, 250; in Berkshire, 273; in Brecknockshire, 273; in Bucks, 273; in Cambs, 273, 309; in Cheshire, 273; in Cornwall, 274, 309 ; in Devon, 274; in Dorset, 274; in Essex, 274; in Gloucestershire, 275; in Hants, 275, 310; in Here- fordshire, 275; in Herts, 275, 353; in Kendal district, 353; in Kent, 276, 277, 310; in Lanes, 310, in Leicestershire, 310; in London, 310; in Middlesex, 277; in Norfolk, 277, 310; in Northamptonshire, 311; in N. Wales, 311; in Nottinghamshire, 353; in Oxfordshire, 277; in Scotland, 354; in Shropshire, 278 ; in Somerset, 278, 311, 312,353; in South Pembroke- shire, 311; in Staffs, 312; in Suffolk, 312; in Surrey, 278, 279, 312, 353; in Sussex, 279, 312; in Westmoreland, 279; in Wilts, 280 ; in Worcestershire, 313; in Yorks, 313

vi INDEX.

Colias hyale in 1899, 91

Colias hyale in June, at Hastbourne, 225; iniMay and June, 313

Colias hyale in 1900, in Berks, 273; in Bucks, 273 ; in Cambs, 273, 309; in Dorset, 274; in Essex, 274, 252; in Gloucestershire, 275; in Hants, 275, 310 ; in Herts, 275, 353; in Kent, 276, 277, 310, 353; in Leicestershire, 310 ; in Middlesex, 277; in Norfolk, 277; in Northamptonshire, 311; in Notting- hamshire, 353; in Oxfordshire, 277 ; in Somerset, 278, 311, 312, 353; in Suffolk, 278, 312; in Surrey, 278, 279; in Sussex, 279, 312; in Wilts, 280; in Worcestershire, 313

Collecting at Deal, three days’, 356; in Hayward’s Heath district, 225; in the Isle of Lewis, 37; at Sidmouth, 307; in South Devon, 326

Collecting and rearing dragonflies, 89

Collective enquiry as to Progressive Me- lanism in moths, 185

Correction, a, 129

Coremia quadrifasciaria at Bexley, 130; in Essex, 225, 249, 272; in Suffolk, 272

Cossus ligniperda larva, 128

Cymatophora ocularis at Chingford, 306

Dasycampa rubigineaat Cambridge, 308 ; in Dorsetshire, 249

Deilephila galii in Gloucestershire, 270 ; livornica in N. Staffordshire, 305

Description of certain varieties of Pero- nea cristana, 179; of a new species of Dircenna from Peru (fig.), 299; of the egg of Polyommatus corydon, 300

Dianthcecia cucubali in August, 305

Dicycla oo in Surrey, 249

Diphyletism in the Lepidoptera, 120, 221

Diphthera aprilina in Moray, 14

Diplosis partheniicola, 201

Diptera of Nottinghamshire, 180

Dircenna barrettii, sp. un. (fig.), 299

Dragonfly, season of, 1899, 137

Dwarf Lepidoptera, 129; Vanessa ata- lanta, 92

Early and late dates for Euchloé carda- mines and other butterflies, 351

Early appearance of Pieris rape, 130

Early occurrence of Anisopteryx sscu- laria, 91

Karwigs beneficial, 87

Editorial, 325

Eggs of Ceroplastes irregularis, 201

Emergence of Clostera reclusa, 12

Ennomos alniaria at Bognor, 306

Entomology in New Zealand, 5, 186

Epinephele (Hipparchia) hyperanthes in Fifeshire, 351; tithonus in abundance, 350

Epunda nigra at Cambridge, 308; in Kent, 271, 306

Eretmoptera, a new dipterous genus, 349 Errata, 202, 359 Euplexia lucipara in February, 131

Field Cricket (Gryllus campestris) near Hastings, 49

Flavour of caterpillars, the, 87

Flatoides, a remarkable instance of, 301

Food-plants of Homoptera, 302

Formalin as a preservative of insects, 90

Gerris lacustris nymph in October, 355

Great destruction of injurious beetles, 11

Guide to the Study of British Water- bugs, a, 148

Gynandromorphous—Argynnis paphia, 266; Colias edusa, 157 ; Lycena ica- rus, 157; Thecla quercus, 157

Habits of Cossus ligniperda, 128, 224

Halias prasinana audible, 247

Heliothis armigera in New Zealand, 201 ; scutosa in South Devon, 306

Hemerobius limbatus in January, 49

Humming sound of Macroglossa stella- tarum, 129

Hybernating two winters, larva of Odo- nestis potatoria, 10

Hymenoptera of Nottinghamshire, 180

Insect fauna of Hampshire, the, 349 Ischnura elegans in London, 225; pu- milio, 201

Larva of Acronycta alni at Tunbridge Wells, 249; of Arctia caia and Odo- nestes potatoria at Chester, 181

Larve-beating in 1899 compared with 1898, 94

Late grasshopper, 355

Lepidoptera, &c., in 1899, 14, 93; at light in 1899, 92; in County Cork, 143, 197; at Winchester in 1899, 15

Lepidopterous eggs on sallow, 14, 49

Leucania albipuncta at Bexhill, 250; vi- tellina at Bognor, 306; in Essex, 306

Libellula quadrimaculata, 248

Liparis chrysorrhoea abundant at Hove, 307

Limenitis sibylla in Surrey, 272

Local scarcity of feniocampa incerta,349

Lycena argiolus, 303 ; in North London, 269; in S. England, 351; bellargus, aberration figured, 281; in Hertford- shire, 303, 352; bwtica bred in Guern- sey, 268; corydon var. fowleri, 104, 157; pheretes and its allies in the Sikim Himalayas, 199, 223

Macrocephalus arizonicus = uhleri, 201

Macroglossa stellatarum, 304; in April, 182; in Gloucestershire, 352; at Hud- dersfield, 249; in Kent, 352; in S. England, 351

INDEX. Vii

Macro-lepidoptera of the Galashiels dis- trict 44; of Hull, 43

Male Bupalus piniaria partly of female coloration, 266

Mamestra furva, corrected date, 92

Melanippe procellata in Essex, 249, 272 ; tristata, 307

Monograph of the Membracide, 301

Mosquitos and malaria, 218

Mould in relaxing-box, 12

Moults in the Odonata, 350

Migration of Libellula quadrimaculata, 247

Migrations of dragonflies, 210

Miscellaneous notes, 308

Naturalized cockroaches, 129

New African dragonflies, 43

New Forest notes, 202, 226; Easter in the, 203

New genus of Coccide injuring the root of the grape-vine in 8. Africa, 173

New insects from Arizona, and a new bee from Mexico, 61

Neuropteron at sugar, 354

Noctua castanea in the New Forest, 270, 305

Note on Anthocharis, 69; on a pupa of Gonoptera libatrix, 305, 355; on a spider, 226; on Ligdia adustata, 10; on the Coccid genus Oudablis, Signo- ret, 85; on the oviposition of Parnas- sius apollo, 282; on Xanthia ferru-

- ginea and X. gilvago, 307

Notes from Chester and Delamere Forest, 182 ; from the Lake district, 355; from Natal, 302 ; from North Staffordshire, 17; from North Wales, 308; from Nottingham, 95 ; from Southend, 308 ; on certain Scoparie (figs.), 109; on Jamaican Rhyhchota, 70; on some Tuddenham Lepidoptera, 39 ; on some Sinhalese Rhynchota, 293; on the great earwig and other British Forficu- lide, 75; on the nymph of Aischna cyanea, 88; on the season of 1899 in Kent, 46; on Triecphora sanguino- lenta, Marsh, 236, 266

Notodonta chaonia, 202 ; double-brooded, 305

dictzoides

OBITUARIES :— W. C. Blatch, 136 William Watkins, 208 Dr. Otto Staudinger, 328 Josef Mik, 364,

Odonata in Kent, 307

On Aigaleus bechuana, a new species of Cimicide#, reported to injure coffee- berries, 77

On a new genus of Lycwenide hitherto confounded with Catochrysops, 1

On a small collection of insects, chiefly Lepidoptera, from Nicaragua, 189

On a small collection of Lepidoptera from Pemba Island, 261

On the Morphology and Classification of the Auchenorrhynchous Homoptera, 116, 169, 334

On the moult to pupa of Pterophorus, 82

On the Nomenclature of the Genera of the Rhynchota, Heteroptera, and Au- chenorrhynchous Homoptera, 25

Oporabia autumnata from Rannoch, with reference to several other re- lated forms, 53, 83

Orthoptera at sugar, 266, 301

Orthoptera localities, 11

Orthopterous Fauna of the British Isles, Belgium, and Holland (fig.), 2

Oviposition of Gonopteryx rhamni, 177

Oviposition of Polygonia c-album, 224

Pairing of Vanessa urtice with Epine- phele tithonus, 224

Papilio machaon in Kent, 248, 267; at Ringwood, 267; in Surrey, 303; in Sussex, 267; in Worcestershire, 303

Parasite in Lepidopterous ovum, 224, 247

Phigalia pedaria in December, 13

Phlogophora meticulosa in December, 13, 92

Photo-micrography for Entomology, 177

Pieris daplidice, &c., at Bognor, 306

Plusia festuce# at Bognor, 306

Plusia festuce with confluent spots, 11

Plusia gamma abundant, 203

Plusia moneta at Merstham, 305; at Norwood, 272; in Oxfordshire, 249

Protective coloration, 301

Proctotrypids ex lepidopterous ova, 247

Pyrameis atalanta swarming, 268

Ranatra linearis, 181 Range in Britain of Epichnopteryx pulla,

Sterrhopteryx hirsutella, Acantho-

pryche opacella, and Pachythelia vil-

losella, 42

Recent LireRaTURE :—

Fauna Hawaiiensis; or, the Zoology of the Sandwich (Hawaiian) Isles, vol. i, Hymenoptera Aculeata, by R. C. L. Perkins and A. Forel. Vol. ii, Orthoptera and Neuroptera, by R. C. L. Perkins, 23

The Hymenoptera of Suffolk, pt. I, by Claude Morley, 50

British Dragonflies (Odonata), by W. J. Lucas, 51

Enumeratio operum opusculorumque ad faunam Hemipterorum Heterop- terorum Imperii Rossici pertinentem 1798-1897, by V. Bianchi, 52

General Index to Miss Ormerod’s Reports on Injurious Insects, 1877- 1898, by R, Newstead, 52

Vill

Transactions of the City of London Entomological and Natural History Society for the year 1898,.99

Fauna Hawajliensis: Macro-Lepido- ptera, by E. Meyrick, 99

Remarks on the Epidemiology and Prophylaxis of Malaria in the light of recent Researches, by A. Celli, 133

Hemiptera Cryptocerata. S. Fam. Mo- nonychine, by A. L. Montandon, 134

The egg-carrying habit of Zaitha, by F. W. Slater, 135

Second Annual Report of the Kendal Entomological Society, 136

Essai sur les Eumastacides, tribu des Acridiodea, by M. Burr, 183

La Chasse aux Insectes aquatiques, by Paul Noel, 184

Report of Injurious Insects and Com- mon Farm Pests during the year 1899, by Eleanor A. Ormerod, 184

Hine neve Plataspidinen-Gattung aus Deutsch Ost-Afrika, by Kuhlgatz, 206

The Spring Elm Caterpillar, by C. M. Weed, 207

Wie vielen Stigmen haben die Rhyn- choten ?, by Anton Handlirsch, 207

Proceedings of the South London Entomological and Natural History Society, 208

A Natural History of the British Lepidoptera, by J. W. Tutt, 231

Note on the Genital Organs of Zaitha, by T. H. Montgomery, 232

Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Association of Econ- omic Entomologists, 232

Preliminary Report on the Insect Enemies of Forests in the North- West, 232

The Coccid Genera Chionaspis and Hemichionaspis, by R. A. Covley, 232

Insects injurious to Forest Trees, by E. P. Felt, 254

The Insects of Alderney, by W. A. Luff, 254

Occasional Memoirs of the Chicago Entomological Society, vol. i, 255

Insecta Transvaaliensia; a Contribu- tion to a Knowledge of the Entomo- logy of South Africa, by W. L. Distant, 280

Recent Work on Japanese Rhynchota, 320

Fifteenth Report—Insects—State of New York, by E. P. Felt, 321

Summary of the Hemiptera of Japan, by P. R. Uhler, 320

The Insect World,—a Monthly Maga- zine, 320

INDEX.

Hémiptéres de l’ile de Yesso (Japon), by Horvath Geza, 320 Uebersicht der Fulgoriden Japans, by Matsumura Shonen, 320 The Lepidoptera of the British Isles, vol. vi, by C. G. Barrett, 322 Catalogue of Eastern and Australian Lepidoptera Heterocera in the Col- lection of the Oxford University Museum, by Col. C. Swinhoe, 322 Transactions of the City of London Entomological and Natural History Society for the year 1899, 323 La raison d’étre des métamorphoses chez les Insectes, by Aug. Lameere, 361 Notes pour la Classification des Coléop- téres, by Aug. Lameere, 361 Notes on the Mosquitoes of the United States (1900), by L. O. Howard, 363 Collecting in South Eastern Europe, by Malcolm Burr, 364 Origin of Species (New Impression), by C. Darwin, 364 Recent notes on Hydrometra martini, Kirk.=lineata, Say, 175 Relaxing Lepidoptera, 12 Remarkable appearance of V. io during snow, 130 Respiration of the dragonfly nymph,

Retarded emergence of Sphinx ligustri, 4

Rhynchota genera, &c., 177; miscel- lanea, 296

Rhynchota of Perthshire, 10

Rhyparobia madere in London, 317

Satyrus semele abundant, 267 Scotosia vetulata at Hemel Hempstead, 249 Scottish Rhynchota, 10 Second generation of Vanessa io, a, 87 Setting relaxed insects, 43, 89 Sirex gigas at Kendal, 307 ; at Worksop, 248; juvencus at Chichester, 354 Socrerres :— Birmingham Entomological, 20, 97, 133, 160, 230, 317 Carlisle Entomological, 20 Entomological Club, 98 Entomological of London, 18, 95, 131, 158, 204, 251, 313, 359 Kendal Entomological, 21 Lancashire and Cheshire Entomolo- gical, 22, 98, 230, 319 South London Entomological » and Natural History, 18, 97, 132, 159, 205, 229, 314 Some additional Notes on Aischna cyanea, 257 Some bees visiting the Mesquite, 243 Some corrections, 49

flowers of

South Eastern Union of Scientific Societies, 180

Sphinx convolvuli at Penarth, 49; in 1889, 91; pinastri in Suffolk, 250

Spilodes sticticalis near Maldon, 272

Spilosoma lubricipeda emerging in August, 250

Spring captures, 181

Stevens collection, the, 155, 178

Stilbia anomala in North Wales, 14

Sugaring, 250; in a garden, 355

Sympetrum flaveolum, 272

Synopsis of Experiments in Hybridiza- tion and Temperature made with Lepidoptera up to the end of 1898, 161, 266, 283, 340

Thamnotrizon cinerus in the New Fo- rest, 92

Thecla w-album larve abundant, 202 ; in the Maidstone district, 269

The genera Cupido and Lycena, 124

The pupal habits of Cossus ligniperda, 128, 158, 177, 224

The type of Thecla, Fabr., 168

Three new species of Nymphaline from Siam, 213

The aberrations of British butterflies, 281

Universal list of entomologists, 350 Unusual pairing of Satyrus semele, 43

Vanessa antiopa in Bucks, 267, 268 ; in Essex, 268, 354; in Hampshire, 268; in Hertfordshire, 304; at Huntingdon, 304; in Kent, 267, 268, 304; in Nor- folk, 304; in Oxfordshire, 250; in Somersetshire, 304; in Suffolk, 268, 304; in Surrey, 304; in Sussex, 267

Vanessa atalanta and V. io abundant, 13; cardui in Bucks, 354; io at Toot- ing, 68; in Yorkshire, 304; poly- chloros at Chichester, 182; at Herne, 304; in London, 304

Variation of Emydia cribrum, L., in England (figs.), 67

VARIETIES :—

Abraxas grossulariata, 97, 179, 316 Acronycta leporina, 248

Agrotis cinerea, 18

Apatura iris, 156

INDEX. 1x

Arctia caia, 103, 178; villica, 178

Argynnis adippe, 156, 281 (fig.), 303; aglaia, 156, 303; euphrosyne, 156; paphia, 102

Bombyx quercus, 103; rubi, 315

Bryophila glandifera, 178

Callimorpha dominula, 178

Cidaria prunata, 179; reticulata, 179

Cleora glabraria, 317

Chrysophanus phleas, 157, 317

Ccenonympha pamphilus, 248

Dianthecia carpophaga, 18 -

Epinephele ianira, 157; tithonus, 157

Euchloé cardamines, 156

Forficula auricularia, 301

Hesperia comma, 157

Limenitis sibylla, 156

Luperinus testacea, 248

Lycena adonis, 157; argiolus, 303 ; arion, 102; bellargus, 281 (fig.) ; corydon, 104, 160; icarus (alexis), 157, 281

Macaria liturata, 248

Melanippe fluctuata, 97

Melanargia galatea, 156, 157

Melita athalia, 156; cinxia, 156

Nemeophila plantaginis, 178, 319

Nola centonalis, 178

Oporabia dilutata, 157

Peronea cristata, 179

Pieris rape, 160

Polyommatus (Lycena) corydon, 316 ; icarus, 315

Pygera curtula x pigra, 19

Saturnia pavonia, 19

Sesia culiciformis, 21

Smerinthus populi, 319; tiliw, 19

Spilosoma mendica, 253

Strenia clathrata, 314

Vanessa atalanta, 101, 103, 156; cardui, 156; io, 156; urtice, 101, HOSS 177

Xylophasia rurea, 248

Zygena filipendulx, 178

Where Txniocampa gracilis laysits egg s, 203

What is the proper name of Lophyrus, Latreille 2? 40

Xanthia gilvago in Surrey, 305

THE ENTOMOLOGIST

Vou. XXXII.) JANUARY, 1900. [No. 440.

ON A NEW GENUS OF LYCHNIDA HITHERTO CONFOUNDED WITH CATOCHRYSOPS.

By A. G. Burter, Pa.D.

Wuitst re-arranging the Museum collection of Lycenide of the genus Catochrysops (type C. strabo), my attention was called to the fact that, apart from the tailed or tailless character of the species, which appears in that genus only to have a specific value, many of the forms are separable from the type and its congeners by having smooth eyes, those of typical Catochrysops being hairy.

I am well aware that, in his recent Catalogue of Rhopalo- cera of the Ethiopian Region,’ my friend Prof. Aurivillius regards Catochrysops and many other genera as mere sections or groups of one huge genus—Cupido. I fail, however, to see why characters, which in other portions of the Rhopalocera are generally regarded as of generic value—such as the absence of a vein in the primaries, the partial anastomosis of certain veins, or the absence of hair on the eyes—should be ignored in the present family. ‘The question as to whether secondary sexual characters should be used for the separation of genera is one which does not concern the present case; personally, I see no profit in calling groups, based upon well-defined male characters, sections or subgenera; it appears to me to be far better to regard them as genera. But to refuse constant structural characters common to both sexes and accompanied by even slight differ- ences of form or pattern, seems to me to be unscientific and retrograde.

EKucHRYSopPS, gen. nov.

Primaries somewhat less acuminate than in Catochrysops ; secondaries invariably tailed, with similarly placed ocelloid

ENTOM.—JANUARY, 1900. B

2 THE ENTOMOLOGIST.

spots sprinkled with metallic scales towards anal angle on under surface ; eyes quite smooth instead of hairy. Type, EH. cnejus.

Of the species at present in the Museum collection, the following should be placed in Kuchrysops :—

E. cnejus= EH. theseus= EH. hapalina, E. contracta, E. ella, E. pandava (of which E. nicola seems to be an intermediate form), EH. trifracta, E. cyclopteris, EH. naidina, E. lochias, E. hippocrates, E. lois.

Wallengren’s beautiful little species, which I have recently quoted as ‘‘ Catochrysops mahallokoena,’’ has smooth eyes, but may at once be separated from Euchrysops by the close approximation of first subcostal branch and costal nervure (veins 11 and 12), and lack of tails to hind wings; it is nearly related to Chilades trochilus. In Neolycena, which has smooth eyes, the third subcostal branch (vein 9) is wholly absent, so that the vein is trifurcate.

THE ORTHOPTEROUS FAUNA OF THE BRITISH ISLES, BELGIUM AND HOLLAND.

By Wid... biooss, -BiA., | EELS.

In the ‘Annales de la Société Entomologique de Belgique,’ October, 1899, appears an article by the veteran Belgian entomo- logist, M. le baron Ed. de Selys-Longchamps, comparing the orthopterous fauna of the British Isles, Belgium, and Holland. A summary of the results arrived at, together with a few notes that seem to be called for in connection with some of the British species, cannot but be of interest to orthopterists in this country also.

Of the Forficulide, six species—Labidura riparia, Anisolabis maritima, A. annulipes, Forficula lesnei, Apterygida arachidis, and Chelisoches morio—are British, or have occurred in Britain, but do not appear to have been observed in Belgium or Holland. Labia minor, Forficula auricularia, and Apterygida albipennis are common to the three countries; while Chelidura acanthopygia occurs in Belgium and Holland, but has not been recorded as British.

Of these nine species set down as British, L. riparia, A. maritima, and A. albipennis have not been taken for some years; A. annulipes and A. arachidis, although they certainly breed here, do so only under artificial conditions as regards tempera- ture ; of C. morio but two specimens have occurred—a pair which came to Kew in sugar-cane from Mauritius in August, 1894 (ante, vol. xxxi. p. 50).

Six species of Blattide are found in all three countries. These are Ectobia lapponica, E. livida, E. panzeri (ericetorum),

ORTHOPTEROUS FAUNA OF THE BRITISH ISLES, ETC. 3

Blatta americana, B. orientalis, and Phyllodromia germanica. B. australasie is now well known in Britain; it has been recorded from Belgium, but it does not appear in the Dutch list. In addition to these, Rhyparobia madere, Leucophea surinam- ensis, Blabera gigantea, and Nyctibora holosericea have been acci- dentally introduced with more or less frequency into Britain, but have not been noticed in Belgium or Holland.

NYCTIBORA HOLOSERICEA.

Eleven species are in this family set down as British, of which the three Ectobias only are indigenous. The three Blattas and Phyllodromia germanica breed here profusely where they are established, but require warmth. It is just possible that L. surinamensis breeds, or has bred, in Kew Gardens. The others are merely ‘‘ casual visitors ’’ due to foreign trade. Of the last, N. holosericea has been but once noticed ; the single specimen was taken at Covent Garden, and sent to Messrs. Watkins and Doncaster, July 6th, 1897. They sent it alive to Mr. Burr, who wishes me to record it. It is a large insect, measuring 90 mm. in expanse of wings, of a fairly uniform rich dark chestnut colour, except the wings, which are to a great extent transparent; the flat dorsal surface of the abdomen is very dark, with much lighter irregular margins. The pronotum and elytra are covered with a fine yellowish pubescence, which in some positions gives them the appearance of emitting a faint phosphorescent light. [Fig. 1. The tarsi of hind legs, cerci, and antenne are restored. |

None of the Mantide are native in either country, though

Mantis religiosa has occurred accidentally in Belgium. 82

4 THE ENTOMOLOGIST.

In all three countries there occur of the Acridiide, Meco- stethus grossus, Stenobothrus viridulus, S. rufipes, S. bicolor, S. elegans, Gomphocerus maculatus, Gidipoda cerulescens (only as a very casual visitor in Britain), Tettix bipunctatus, and T. subulatus, while Pachytylus migratorius is a casual visitor to each. Steno- bothrus lineatus, S. parallelus, and Gomphocerus rufus are com- mon to Britain and Belgium; while Stenobothrus biguttulus, Pachytylus danicus (cinerascens), and Psophus stridulus are common to Belgium and Holland. Gomphocerus sibiricus, Acridium egypticum (tartaricum), and Schistocerca peregrina have occurred casually in Britain alone; Stenobothrus stig- maticus, S. hemorrhoidalis, S. vagans, and S. dorsatus are found in Belgium only; Holland possesses none that are peculiar to itself.

One specimen only of Gomphocerus sibiricus was captured some years since ‘on the hills at Netley’’; it is difficult to imagine how a single specimen could have got there.

Of the fifteen Locustide enumerated by De Selys-Long- champs, Leptophyes punctatissima, Meconema varium, Xiphidium dorsale, Locusta viridissima, Platycleis grisea, P. brachyptera, and Decticus verrucivorus are found in all three countries. Thamno- trizon cinereus and Platycleis reselii are found in Britain and Belgium; Ephippigera vitiwm occurs in Belgium and Holland. Barbitistes serricauda, Gampsocleis glabra, and Platycleis bicolor are peculiar to Belgium; while Phaneroptera falcata has occurred casually once and Decticus albifrons very rarely, in Britain alone.

Four species of the Gryllide—Nemobius sylvestris, Gryllus ‘campestris, G. domesticus, and Gryllotalpa vulgaris-—occur in all three countries. Gryllus capensis is found in Holland only, while G. bimaculatus, G. brunneri, and Gryllotalpa didactyla are casuals in Belgium alone.

To sum up as far as Britain is concerned, there are twenty- nine (or twenty-eight if Decticus verrucivorus is omitted) Ortho- ptera that appear to be natives;* seven (two earwigs, with but a slight foothold, four cockroaches, and the common cricket), which breed here in warm houses; three earwigs that are more or less historic; the rest are casuals. These last might no doubt be added to considerably. Burr states that some species of the Conocephalides, especially of the genera Copiophora and Cono- cephalus, have been taken in London. A specimen of Phane- roptera privata has been found at Merton Hall, in Norfolk. I have in my own possession five Orthoptera from Kew Gardens not included in the list. One of them is probably Copiophora brevirostris ; the others are not yet identified, but the presence of all is of a most casual nature.

* Burr considers D. verrucivorus, A. albipennis, and L. riparia to be indigenous,

plans ers

ENTOMOLOGY IN NEW ZEALAND. By Amprose Qua, F.E.S.

I arrived in this colony three years ago from London, and soon found that entomologists were scarce and scattered; in consequence I had to depend on my own resources for prosecuting entomological study, there being little or no literary work—at least get-at-able. When one is thus thrown upon his own knowledge, with an entirely unknown fauna to deal with, it is surprising what little headway can be made.

Again, locality is an important factor. In this respect I have been unfortunate. First, in Auckland the district is volcanic and comparatively sterile, hence a dearth of Insecta; next, I became located in an inland town, wherefrom it is almost impossible to get away for collecting purposes, the district being more or less under cultivation, all bush having been burnt off—the usual plan. Doubtless bush land would be an ‘‘ El Dorado” to an entomologist.

Recently I discovered that Professor F. W. Hutton is the author of descriptive catalogues of New Zealand Diptera, Hymenoptera, Orthoptera, and Neuroptera; and, of course, the late W. M. Maskell’s special work on the Coccide (Homoptera) has a world-wide reputation, and is of scientific importance. E. Meyrick seems to have been the most prominent writer on the Lepidoptera, his work being scattered amongst scientific publications; and G. V. Hudson, already the author of an elementary text-book on New Zealand entomology, has, during the last few months, published a work on the ‘‘ Macro ’”’-Lepi- doptera of New Zealand, based upon the scattered work of Meyrick.

Under these circumstances, one can realize what Stainton has done for British lepidopterists. Cavil as we may at Newman, they both popularized the study of Lepidoptera in England, and laid the foundation stones upon which the present generation has raised, at any rate, this branch of entomology to the level of botany, and the rank of a science. From this point of view great credit is due to a ‘‘ pioneer” author, and G. V. Hudson’s work will be a useful volume to local entomologists, though it does not rank with the high-class scientific work of many recent writers—Scudder, Packard, Dyar, Comstock, Chapman, Hamp- son, Tutt, and others—with which the writer seems to be unacquainted. In